Sunday, June 29, 2014

Vogue Sewing book 1964

Its time to get a little sophisticated around here! 

You maybe remember earlier this year I showed you some photos from the Simplicity Sewing book of 1969. Well I also happen to own the Vogue sewing book from 1964 - which is completely different to the Simplicity book. 

Everything is way more couture focused and speaks a lot more of Paris and the classic sewing techniques you can learn. Very fancy!

So while one of these books is fun, colourful and the models are all dancing around. This book is beautifully  photographed and includes lots of lovely illustrations, not unlike the kind you might find inside Pierre Balmain's sketch book.

So lets have a look!




The chapter illustrations are all so well drawn and have that wonderful early 60s feel. They remind me of the lovely Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina 





And like all sewing books, there is a lovely display of fabric and trim types all artfully arranged, I'm assuming to be both visually stimulating and educational for what can sometimes be a bit of a trivial subject. 

I know it's hard to explain in a book the difference between velvet and velveteen, but I guess if the editor is creative about it, it can just become a fun page to look at instead!







On to the high fashion bits. This book makes a point of reminding sewers about the designers of the Vogue patterns and it relates to home sewing. 

By the end of the 60s, sewing had moved into a less restrictive space where home sewers and young girls were given as much respect by the pattern making companies as the designers were. So this Vogue book is speaking somewhat more to those sewers who still enjoyed the couture aspects of sewing and perhaps still looked to Paris each season for the new trends. Of course as the decade moved on, both London and New York took away some of that market and made fashion less alienating for people who just wanted to sew for fun!



Some of the designers mentioned; Pierre Balmain, Irene Galitzine, Guy Laroche, Emilio Pucci and Pierre Cardin

The modelling photos are similar to the dynamic highly stylised photos seen in the normal Vogue magazine. None of the models are credited, but I think Jean Shrimpton may be featured along side other popular models of the time (but did not keep their fame like Jean)

 




Jean? Is that you in the Purple tweed suit?




Reading this sewing book leaves you feeling a little like you've just been taken through a dozen couture workshops and learnt a bunch of fancy techniques - however, most of those same techniques are now not mentioned in modern books at all!

None the less, the photos are lovely and help to remind you of the highly technical skills once taught to most sewing students.

Which of the two books do you prefer? The high class Vogue book? or the fun and accessible Simplicity book? 

Thanks for popping in lovelies!
Cat xo

24 comments:

  1. Great post! One of the things I find so fascinating about the 60s is how fashion really accelerated and changed and comparing these two books illustrates the point perfectly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yes, youre right! i do love comparing books and patterns from both ends to the decade to see how much they've changed!

      Delete
  2. I love the '69 book! I prefer the later 1960s and I like the fun aspect of sewing. I'm not too fussed about couture or "high fashion" or any of that. Heck, I'm not even too fussed if my stitches aren't completely straight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. haha yes me too! sewing should be a fun and enjoyable experience. not one that makes you feel like your being watched over by your 7th grade home-ec teacher!

      Delete
  3. What a great book. I just love the illustrations and the fashions are so chic!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yes aren't they just! i could imagine you and your chic hair-do in there!

      Delete
  4. Hi, Catherine! Here I am giving you "two comments for the price of one." :) I remember your Simplicity post and revisited it just now. As a U.S. male I prefer the Simplicity book because it depicts women in a more down to earth manner. To this day I am not very fond of highly stylized modeling concepts. I find it much more satisfying to see pictures of the girl next door looking her best, dressed as she normally would on the street, classroom or office.

    Have a wonderful week, dear friend Catherine!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. aww aren't i lucky! haha! i agree, its lovely to hear women are more pleasant when they look more natural. despite many men thinking this way there are still many women who i think dress up a little too much sometimes and then wonder why they attract men who cant respect them. its a funny, depressing world fashion and beauty!

      Delete
  5. What a great book! I often prefer older publications too, modern books can sometimes feel a little dumbed down in comparison I think. I don't know if it's because they figure people can't be bothered nowadays? If so that's a pretty sad reflection of today. I have to say I prefer the simplicity book though, the bright fun fashions of the latter part of the '60s being my favourite.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. haha yes, I think it is! but also we're quite time poor these days so quick patterns and techniques are more favourable I guess. And yes to colour! the girls in the second book all look like they are dancing!

      Delete
  6. Thank you for the review, the pictures in the Vogue book are really something aren't they. I love all sewing books, old and new, but especially the old ones. I'm ever hopeful that I will come across the Vogue ones in an op-shop somewhere.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yes! aren't they gorgeous! I tend to see a lot of these old sewing books and pattern books on Etsy for between $20 and $40!

      Delete
  7. What a wonderful book, I love the big coats they are so structural and cocoon like. I always wish I had the height to be able to wear them. Am always afraid I'd just look like I was wearing a blanket.

    Thank you so much for sharing this, so inspiring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha oh no! I do agree though, even with my height i still think the look odd. You definitely need to wear heels with them! I'm glad you like the book too!

      Delete
  8. What a fantastic book to own! Purely for aesthetics though I'd have to say I prefer the Simplicity book and it's beautiful bright colours. That is not to say I don't think this one is beautiful too though!
    And that model in the Tweed suit, she looks like Jean to me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! I do agree. I prefer the 1969 book too! It just looks way more fun!
      And yay you agree with me, I'm quite sure it is her. She was modelling for Vogue a lot around this time.

      Delete
  9. I've got that book somewhere in the depths of the bookshelf. I don't really understand any of the text but the photos, fashions and illustrations are utterly wonderful! xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha yes! A lot of it is a load of jibber jabber for sophisticated ladies of the early 60s. I Don't think ill gap ever use it for anything other then a visual reference

      Delete
  10. I love the look of the Vogue book, although it would probably be too complicated for me! Does it help guide you through Vogue patterns? Great post, I may have to look out for books like these!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It doesn't really mention any specific patterns. It's more how to assemble things in general. Actually checking back there is hardly any reference to pattern numbers at all!! It just talks about sewing and already made designer clothes

      Delete
  11. The vogue one really appeals to me - from an aspirational and design point of view. The Graphic designer in me is loving those page layouts!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! It really does have some lovely layouts. I wonder if Diana Vreeland had any influence over it?? It also has these little motifs throughout the book to mark chapter starts but I didn't take photos of them. They look a little too Victorian - almost out of place!

      Delete
  12. Thanks so much for sharing this! What a beautiful and inspiring book. So much eye candy! The illustrations, the layouts and the patterns, just gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh I know! I love the little illustrations! The remind me of Audrey Hepburn!

      Delete

Thanks for your comment! Please do not comment anonymously - feel free to use the Name/URL option instead as I’d still love to hear from you xo

*Spam comments will be swiftly deleted, so please do not bother